Premiere Pro Tutorial Part 53: Slip Into Sync

Adobe Premiere ProBy Andrew Devis (doodleNEWS)

One of the reasons why you might want to un-link the video and audio portions of a clip in Premiere Pro is to create an edit type called a ‘split edit.’ In short, you want the audio or the video to start before the other part to help build anticipation, or as part of a dialogue sequence where you’re looking at one person while hearing the other person. This is a much used technique in video editing.

As in the last tutorials, when you move the audio or video out of sync, Premiere Pro gives you great notice and options for moving them back into sync again.

Out-of-Sync

Out-of-Sync

We’ve covered the ‘Move into Sync’ option, so now let’s look at the ‘Slip into Sync’ option.

As with the Move into Sync option in Premiere Pro, the portion of the clip you right-click on the red warning box for is very important, as it will affect what you see and hear in your sequence.

If you right-click on the video portion, then you will force the video to slip along the timeline, giving you new ‘in and out’ points for the video. In other words, you will see a different selection from your original selection – which may not be what you want! The length of the clip remains the same with a different selection.

First Frame Prior to Slip

First Frame Prior to Slip

First Frame After Slip

First Frame After Slip

So, it is more common to right-click on the audio, as this will bring the mouth movement and the sound back into sync. However, as with the video clip, you will have new in and out points for your audio, but without changing your video selection.

Audio Prior to Slip

Audio Prior to Slip

Audio After Slip

Audio After Slip

If you’d like to learn more about Premiere Pro CC, check out Larry Jordan’s extensive training or sign up for a membership for on-demand video editing courses.